Fotógrafo retrata como dormem as crianças sírias que fugiram da guerra

Os conflitos armados na Síria já fizeram com que mais de 4 milhões de pessoas deixassem o país. Destas, mais 1 milhão são crianças com menos de 12 anos. Acompanhados da família ou enviados sozinhos para que fujam do terror e da opressão, os pequenos chegam assustados à Europa e a outras partes do Oriente Médio.

Essas crianças deixaram para trás seus quartos, seus brinquedos favoritos, familiares, amigos e sonhos. Sem recursos, sucumbem a doenças e encontram em qualquer lugar, seja grama ou asfalto, um canto para dormir. Mas nem os sonhos são um lugar seguro: muitos relatam pesadelos e flashes de bombas e violências. Apesar da pouca idade, essas crianças já viram de perto o lado mais cruel do ser humano.

O fotojornalista Magnus Wennman viajou pela Europa captando o sono assustado e leve dos pequenos sírios que fugiram da guerra. As imagens são de apertar o coração de qualquer um:

EXCLUSIVE, SPECIAL FEES APPLY. Must Credit - Magnus Wennman/Rex Mandatory Credit: Photo by Must Credit - Magnus Wen/REX Shutterstock (2853832n) Lamar, 5, sleeping on the ground in Horgos, Serbia Magnus Wennman: Where the children Sleep - 27 Sep 2015 Back home in Baghdad the dolls, the toy train, and the ball are left; Lamar often talks about these items when home is mentioned. The bomb changed everything. The family was on its way to buy food when it was dropped close to their house. It was not possible to live there anymore, says Lamar's grandmother, Sara. After two attempts to cross the sea from Turkey in a small, rubber boat they succeeded in coming here to Hungary's closed border. Now Lamar sleeps on a blanket in the forest, scared, frozen, and sad.

EXCLUSIVE, SPECIAL FEES APPLY. Must Credit - Magnus Wennman/Rex Mandatory Credit: Photo by Must Credit - Magnus Wen/REX Shutterstock (2853832a) Abdullah, 5, sleeping outside a railway station in Belgrade, Serbia Magnus Wennman: Where the children Sleep - 27 Sep 2015 Abdullah has a blood disease. For the last two days he has been sleeping outside of the central station in Belgrade. He saw the killing of his sister in their home in Daraa. He is still in shock and has nightmares every night, says his mother. Abdullah is tired and is not healthy, but his mother does not have any money to buy medicine for him.

EXCLUSIVE, SPECIAL FEES APPLY. Must Credit - Magnus Wennman/Rex Mandatory Credit: Photo by Must Credit - Magnus Wen/REX Shutterstock (2853832b) Abdul Karim, 17, sleeping in Omonoia Square in Athens, Greece Magnus Wennman: Where the children Sleep - 27 Sep 2015 Abdul Karim Addo has no money left. He bought a ferry ticket to Athens with his last euros. Now he spends the night in Omonoia Square, where hundreds of refugees are arriving every day. Here smugglers are making big money arranging false passports as well as bus and plane tickets to people in flight - but Abdul Karin is not going anywhere. He is able to borrow a telephone and call home to his mother in Syria, but he is not able to tell her how bad things are. "She cries and is scared for my sake and I don't want to worry her more". He unfolds his blanket in the middle of the square and curls up in the fetal position. "I dream of two things: to sleep in a bed again and to hug my younger sister".

EXCLUSIVE, SPECIAL FEES APPLY. Must Credit - Magnus Wennman/Rex Mandatory Credit: Photo by Must Credit - Magnus Wen/REX Shutterstock (2853832e) Ahmad, 7, sleeping on the ground in Horgos, Hungary Magnus Wennman: Where the children Sleep - 27 Sep 2015 Even sleep is not a free zone; it is then that the terror replays. Ahmad was home when the bomb hit his family's house in Idlib. Shrapnel hit him in the head, but he survived. His younger brother did not. The family had lived with war as their nearest neighbor for several years, but without a home they had no choice. They were forced to flee. Now Ahmad lays among thousands of other refugees on the asphalt along the highway leading to Hungary's closed border. This is day 16 of their flight. The family has slept in bus shelters, on the road, and in the forest, explains Ahmad's father.

EXCLUSIVE, SPECIAL FEES APPLY. Must Credit - Magnus Wennman/Rex Mandatory Credit: Photo by Must Credit - Magnus Wen/REX Shutterstock (2853832c) Ahmed, 6, sleeping on the ground in Horgos, Serbia Magnus Wennman: Where the children Sleep - 27 Sep 2015 It is after midnight when Ahmed falls asleep in the grass. The adults are still sitting around, formulating plans for how they are going to get out of Hungary without registering themselves with the authorities. Ahmed is six years old and carries his own bag over the long stretches that his family walks by foot. "He is brave and only cries sometimes in the evenings," says his uncle, who has taken care of Ahmed since his father was killed in their hometown Deir ez-Zor in northern Syria.

EXCLUSIVE, SPECIAL FEES APPLY. Must Credit - Magnus Wennman/Rex Mandatory Credit: Photo by Must Credit - Magnus Wen/REX Shutterstock (2853832g) Fara, 2, asleep in Azraq, Jordan Magnus Wennman: Where the children Sleep - 27 Sep 2015 Fara, 2, loves soccer. Her dad tries to make balls for her by crumpling up anything he can find, but they don't last long. Every night he says goodnight to Fara and her big sister Tisam, 9, in the hope that tomorrow will bring them a proper ball to play with. All other dreams seem to be beyond his reach, but he is not giving up on this one.

EXCLUSIVE, SPECIAL FEES APPLY. Must Credit - Magnus Wennman/Rex Mandatory Credit: Photo by Must Credit - Magnus Wen/REX Shutterstock (2853832h) Iman, 2, in a hospital bed in Azraq, Jordan Magnus Wennman: Where the children Sleep - 27 Sep 2015 Iman, 2, has pneumonia and a chest infection. This is her third day in this hospital bed. "She sleeps most of the time now. Normally she's a happy little girl, but now she's tired. She runs everywhere when she's well. She loves playing in the sand", says her mother Olah, 19.

EXCLUSIVE, SPECIAL FEES APPLY. Must Credit - Magnus Wennman/Rex Mandatory Credit: Photo by Must Credit - Magnus Wen/REX Shutterstock (2853832l) Mahdi, 1.5, asleep on the ground in Horgos, Serbia Magnus Wennman: Where the children Sleep - 27 Sep 2015 Mahdi is one and one half years old. He has only experienced war and flight. He sleeps deeply despite the hundreds of refugees climbing around him. They are protesting against not being able to travel further through Hungary. On the other side of the border hundreds of police are standing. They have orders from the Primary Minister Viktor Orban to protect the border at every cost. The situation is becoming more desperate and the day after the photo is taken, the police use tear gas and water cannons on the refugees.

EXCLUSIVE, SPECIAL FEES APPLY. Must Credit - Magnus Wennman/Rex Mandatory Credit: Photo by Must Credit - Magnus Wen/REX Shutterstock (2853832m) Maram, 8, in Amman, Jordan Magnus Wennman: Where the children Sleep - 27 Sep 2015 Eight-year-old Maram had just come home from school when the rocket hit her house. A piece of the roof landed right on top of her. Her mother took her to a field hospital, and from there she was airlifted across the border to Jordan. Head trauma caused a brain hemorrhage. For the first 11 days, Maram was in a coma. She is now conscious, but has a broken jaw and can’t speak.

EXCLUSIVE, SPECIAL FEES APPLY. Must Credit - Magnus Wennman/Rex Mandatory Credit: Photo by Must Credit - Magnus Wen/REX Shutterstock (2853832o) Mohammed, 13, in hospital in Nizip, Turkey Magnus Wennman: Where the children Sleep - 27 Sep 2015 Mohammed, 13, loves houses. Back home in Aleppo he used to enjoy walking around the city looking at them. Now many of his favourite buildings are gone, blown to pieces. Lying in his hospital bed he wonders whether he will ever fulfill his dream of becoming an architect. "The strangest thing about war is that you get used to feeling scared. I wouldn't have believed that", says Mohammed.

EXCLUSIVE, SPECIAL FEES APPLY. Must Credit - Magnus Wennman/Rex Mandatory Credit: Photo by Must Credit - Magnus Wen/REX Shutterstock (2853832p) Ralia, 7 and Rahaf, 13, sleeping on the street in Beirut Magnus Wennman: Where the children Sleep - 27 Sep 2015 Ralia, 7, and Rahaf, 13, live on the streets of Beirut. They are from Damascus, where a grenade killed their mother and brother. Along with their father they have been sleeping rough for a year. They huddle close together on their cardboard boxes. Rahaf says she is scared of 'bad boys' at which Ralia starts crying.

EXCLUSIVE, SPECIAL FEES APPLY. Must Credit - Magnus Wennman/Rex Mandatory Credit: Photo by Must Credit - Magnus Wen/REX Shutterstock (2853832q) Moyad, 5, in hospital in Amman, Jordan Magnus Wennman: Where the children Sleep - 27 Sep 2015 Moyad, 5, and his mother needed to buy flour to make a spinach pie. Hand in hand they were on their way to the market. They walked past a taxi in which someone had placed a bomb. Moyad's mother died instantly. The boy, who has been airlifted to Jordan, has shrapnel lodged in his head, back and pelvis.

EXCLUSIVE, SPECIAL FEES APPLY. Must Credit - Magnus Wennman/Rex Mandatory Credit: Photo by Must Credit - Magnus Wen/REX Shutterstock (2853832t)  Tamam, 5, in Azraq, Jordan Magnus Wennman: Where the children Sleep - 27 Sep 2015 Five-year-old Tamam is scared of her pillow. She cries every night at bedtime. The air raids on her hometown of Homs usually took place at night, and although she has been sleeping away from home for nearly two years now, she still doesn't realize that her pillow is not the source of danger.

EXCLUSIVE, SPECIAL FEES APPLY. Must Credit - Magnus Wennman/Rex Mandatory Credit: Photo by Must Credit - Magnus Wen/REX Shutterstock (2853832u) Walaa, 5, in Dar-El-Ias Magnus Wennman: Where the children Sleep - 27 Sep 2015 Walaa, 5, wants to go home. She had her own room in Aleppo, she tells us. There, she never used to cry at bedtime. Here, in the refugee camp, she cries every night. Resting her head on the pillow is horrible, she says, because nighttime is horrible. That was when the attacks happened. By day, Walaa's mother often builds a little house out of pillows, to teach her that they are nothing to be afraid of.

EXCLUSIVE, SPECIAL FEES APPLY. Must Credit - Magnus Wennman/Rex Mandatory Credit: Photo by Must Credit - Magnus Wen/REX Shutterstock (2853832v) Sham, 1, in Horgos, Serbia Magnus Wennman: Where the children Sleep - 27 Sep 2015  In the very front, just alongside the border between Serbia and Hungary by the 4-meter-high iron gate, Sham is laying in his mother's arms. Just a few decimeters behind them is the Europe they so desperately are trying to reach. Only one day before the last refugees were allowed through and taken by train to Austria. But Sham and his mother arrived too late, along with thousands of other refugees who now wait outside the closed Hungarian border.

Todas as fotos © Magnus Wennman

Para que a solidariedade não se fique pela comoção, existem milhares de pessoas tentando ajudar os refugiados a chegar em segurança a diferentes países, principalmente na Europa. Uma das iniciativas que mais nos impressionou foi a de um grupo de jovens salva-vidas que juntou 15 mil euros dos seus próprios bolsos (mais de R$ 60 mil no câmbio atual) para resgatar pessoas na ilha de Lesbos. Todos os dias, eles ajudam cerca de mil pessoas, entre as quais muitas crianças, a pisar chão firme e mais seguro.

No entanto, para continuar, eles precisam de mais apoio e por isso lançaram a campanha. Abaixo um vídeo de apresentação e aqui o link através do qual você pode ajudar (e conhecer melhor) esse trabalho.

[Via Mashable]

Luz ultravioleta revela cores originais de estátuas gregas: bem diferente do que imaginávamos

 https://i0.wp.com/www.hypeness.com.br/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/EstatuaGrega11.jpg
Quem estuda ou gosta de restauração de obras sabe das diversas técnicas por trás de grandes obras, e como é difícil reproduzir o mais fielmente possível as cores originais, materiais e outras incontáveis nuances que deixam uma obra restaurada com a aparência que devia ter: original.

Obras de arte e construções muito antigas (por antigas entenda-se milhares de anos) perdem suas cores originais e, mesmo com muitos estudos e muitas horas de testes, é difícil chegar nas cores exatas da primeira versão – e a verdade é que elas não são exatamente as cores sóbrias que imaginávamos. Aliás, era tudo bem berrante e um tanto cafona!

Segundo o site Cliografia, estudantes de arte descobriram padrões perdidos nas antigas estátuas gregas, de forma relativamente simples, usando a iluminação certa, no lugar certo.

Uma técnica chamada “raking light”, que tem sido usada há anos na análise artística e consiste em posicionar uma lâmpada cuidadosamente, de modo que o caminho da luz seja quase paralelo à superfície do objeto, e que, quando usada em pinturas, torna claramente visíveis as pinceladas, assim como sujeiras e imperfeições. Em estátuas, o efeito é levemente sutil, pois tintas diferentes envelhecem em diferentes velocidades. Padrões mais elaborados se tornam visíveis.

Acima, uma pintura examinada com a técnica raking light, que é muito usada para verificar a condição da superfície da pintura antes, durante e depois da conservação.A luz ultravioleta também é usada para distinguir padrões, que faz com com que muitos compostos orgânicos se tornem fluorescentes. Por isso que em estátuas da Grécia antiga, pequenos fragmentos de pigmento que ainda restam na superfície brilham, iluminando padrões mais detalhados.
 
Ainda segundo o Cliografia, depois que é feito o mapeamento, há a questão de como descobrir quais cores serão usadas na reconstituição. Imagine que uma série de azuis escuros criarão um efeito bem diferente do que uma combinação de dourado e rosa. Mesmo se for deixada uma quantidade suficiente de pigmento para que o olho nu perceba a cor, alguns milhares de anos de idade podem modificar consideravelmente o aspecto de uma estátua. Não há como saber se a cor vista hoje tem qualquer coisa a ver com a tonalidade original.

Mas existe uma solução: as cores podem esmaecer com o tempo, mas os materiais originais (como pigmentos derivados de animais e plantas, pedras quebradas ou conchas) ainda possuem a mesma aparência. Isso também pode ser visto pela técnica das luzes.

EstatuaGrega1

O infravermelho ajuda a determinar os compostos orgânicos, já os raios-x só param quando encontram algo realmente pesado, como pedras ou minerais. Assim, os pesquisadores podem determinar de que cor uma estátua milenar foi pintada.

O material ganhou uma exposição chamada ‘Gods in Color: Painted Sculpture of Classical Antiquity‘ (Algo como “Deuses em cores: escultura pintada da antiguidade clássica“), e o Hypeness separou algumas das curiosas restaurações:

 

EstatuaGregaExtra 

 

EstatuaGrega10 

EstatuaGrega4 

 

 

EstatuaGrega9 

EstatuaGrega8 

 

article-1305025-0ADF0C8C000005DC-126_634x318 

449x625 

s6 

st 

su 

nic-3 

nic-5 

nic-7
Fotos via Harvard Magazine / Moco Choco

Campanha pede que pessoas se desfaçam de casacos de pele para ajudar a salvar filhotes resgatados

https://scontent-gru2-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/14448981_1780162988926788_1452689586609614028_n.jpg?oh=b12a1997810efdd46b106d432f878fa3&oe=5875F0FF

Lembra de quando não havia nada mais chique do que desfilar por aí com um casaco de pele? Por sorte, a nossa consciência sobre o uso de peles mudou – e a moda acompanhou estas mudanças. Graças a isso, ninguém mais acha bonito sair por aí com um animal morto nas costas (ufa!). O que talvez você ainda não saiba é que estes casacos de pele esquecidos no armário podem ajudar a salvar filhotes de animais resgatados.

Animais selvagens que perderam suas famílias precisam de todo o cuidado possível para se recuperar e para que possam ser reinseridos em seu habitat natural. Uma boa maneira de fazer isso é permitindo que eles fiquem tão quentinhos e seguros quanto se estivessem sendo cuidados pelos próprios pais. E é justamente aí que entram os casacos e acessórios de pele!

pele1

Foto © The Fund for Animals Wildlife Center

Esses itens que estavam juntando poeira no guarda-roupas agora podem ser usados para aquecer os filhotinhos resgatados e oferecer a eles a sensação de conforto como se estivessem sendo acolhidos pela própria família. Para permitir que isso aconteça, a organização Born Free USA criou a campanha Peles para os Animais, que já arrecadou mais de 800 acessórios de pele para distribuir a centros de reabilitação da vida selvagem ao longo dos Estados Unidos.

pele6

Foto © Kim Rutledge

Esta é a terceira vez que a campanha é realizada pela instituição. Segundo o The Dodo, estima-se que o material arrecadado tenha sido responsável pela morte de cerca de 26 mil animais. E essa é a oportunidade de transformar tanta destruição em algo positivo, ajudando a preservar a vida de diversas espécies.

Se você tiver casacos ou acessórios de pele em casa, pode doá-los até o dia 31 de dezembro de 2016, enviando-os para: Born Free USA, 2300 Wisconsin Ave. NW, Suite 100B, Washington, D.C. 20007.

pele2

Foto © Snowdon Wildlife Sanctuary

pele7

Foto © The Fund for Animals Wildlife Center

pele5

Foto © Blue Ridge Wildlife Center

pele4

pele3

Fotos © The Fund for Animals Wildlife Center

A virada de jogo do ‘cão mais solitário do mundo’ rumo a um final feliz

Freya, uma cachorrinha da raça Staffordshire Bull Terrier que sofre de epilepsia, foi resgatada das ruas da Grã-Bretanha e levada para um abrigo de animais, onde permaneceu por aproximadamente 6 anos a espera de uma família que quisesse adotá-la.

captura-de-tela-2016-09-24-as-22-47-29

Mas após ser rejeitada mais de 18 mil vezes e ficar conhecida como o cão mais solitário do mundo, sua história finalmente mudou. Quando Michael Bay, diretor de Armagedom e Pearl Harbor, leu sobre Freya num jornal local, não pensou duas vezes em criar um papel para ela no seu próximo filme, Transformers: O Último Cavalheiro.

captura-de-tela-2016-09-24-as-22-47-09

Agora, a cachorrinha passa seus dias sendo muito paparicada por toda a equipe, que inclui grandes atores como Anthony Hopkins e Mark Wahlberg. “Ela está demais, desempenhando um trabalho incrível de atuação!”, disse o orgulhoso diretor.

640x364

E parece que a sorte de Freya realmente mudou, já que além de virar uma estrela de cinema, ela foi adotada em julho, e finalmente encontrou um lar para chamar de seu.

captura-de-tela-2016-09-24-as-22-47-43

Imagens © Divulgação

Ele viaja pelo Reino Unido fotografando a magia por trás de lugares abandonados

https://scontent-gru2-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/14440703_1780172922259128_744234579965750052_n.jpg?oh=c572f26f8bbf2c813fb6d9d826fe1f40&oe=58612181

Lugares abandonados podem ser assustadores porém, em outra medida, intensamente belos. Como um registro da passagem do tempo, os locais hoje parecem revelar outra beleza que floresce – muitas vezes literalmente – a partir de seu próprio abandono.

O trabalho e a paixão do fotógrafo Simon Yeung é justamente viajar por todo o Reino Unido para encontrar e registrar a aura e a força desses locais.

abandonados10

Fotografar locais abandonados se tornou minha obsessão. Muitas viajo longas distâncias só para registrar um desses lugares”, ele afirma. Suas fotos parecem misturar a solidão monumental desses abandonos com as remanescências de um passado habitado e vivo. Plena em metáforas e sensações, as imagens de Simon funcionam como um estranho tipo de relógio, em que o passado e o presente se encontram e se sobrepõem, fora do tempo.

abandonados9

abandonados7

abandonados6

abandonados4

abandonados3

abandonados8

abandonados2

abandonados5

abandonados1

Para ver mais do trabalho de Simon Yeung, acesse sua conta no Instagram.

Todas as fotos © Simon Yeung